Preparing Your Elevator for a Hurricane

It’s hurricane season again, so we’re keeping this checklist up at the top of our blog. Let’s all make sure to stay safe, and if you need us, we’re here for you.

So, on to the hurricane preparedness list…

BEFORE THE HURRICANE

  • Check all sump pumps, float switches and alarms in elevator pits.
  • Close up all vents and openings in top of hoistway and machine room to prevent water from entering.
  • If elevators open to the outside, place sandbags along the bottom of hoistway doors. Since this makes the elevator unusable, do this just before shutting down the elevator.

DURING THE HURRICANE

  • Run elevators to the top floor of hoistway and pull the main breaker in the elevator machine room (not in the building’s main breaker room).
  • Park elevators with doors closed.
  • Do not operate elevators during the hurricane.

AFTER THE HURRICANE

  • Inspect the elevator pit, cab and machine room for any water. Do not energize main line breaker if water is found.
  • If water is found, call your elevator service provider immediately!
  • Do not attempt to start elevator if power is out – call your electric company

Even with the proper preparations, hurricanes often cause power outages and surges that can stop elevators between floors and entrap passengers, and worse, knock out the emergency communication system. Be aware that people may be trapped in elevators with no way to call for help. We can’t state this strongly enough: never try to exit, or attempt to help others exit, a stalled elevator without trained professional rescue workers on hand.

Lift Aide instead of First Aide

Continuing our week of highlighting safety, today we want to introduce you to something we designed for ourselves, and now provide to the industry.

This is our Lift Aide system, which we developed to prevent strains or injury when lifting heavy escalator controllers in or out of escalator pits. The Lift Aide is certified with a lift capacity of 200 pounds, providing an easier means of removing heavy controllers for escalator servicing.

How does it work? A support bracket is permanently installed inside the escalator pit. The Lift-Aide easily slides into this support bracket, providing a safe and almost effortless means of lifting the controller out for service.

Extra brackets and hardware are available, so you can install them into all of the difficult units you have in service. That way only one Lift Aide is needed, as it can easily be moved from unit to unit.

For more information, see our website: KONE Spares Lift Aide »

Splitting Flat Elevator Cable

What is so special about splitting flat elevator cable?

The need for safety.

When the elevator industry began to use flat traveling cables, the task of stripping the PVC cable jacket introduced the need for customized tools.

In the interest of safety, KONE Spares engineers designed a special cable splitter for flat cables that both increased safety and made it much easier to cut the jacket and get to undamaged wires inside.

For added safety, always wear cut-resistant gloves when using any cable splitting device.

More information about this KONE Spares exclusive tool can be found on our website here: KONE Spares Flat Cable Splitter

Don’t Take A Child Wearing a Leash or Harness onto an Elevator or Escalator

When properly maintained, and used as intended, elevators and escalators are some of the safest methods of transportation in existence. But…

Tom Sybert over on his Elevator Radio Show Podcast makes a very good point with a message that really needs to be spread: if you use a type of harness or leash on a small child, do not take your child on an elevator or escalator.

This came up in the wake of the Malaysian tragedy where a small child, playing at the top of an escalator, was pulled over the side and fell five stories to her death. Some articles apparently are using this to encourage parents to harness or leash a small child while in public to prevent this from happening, but this is actually a very bad idea.

Anything dangling like a leash — as well as untied shoelaces, long coat straps, etc. — can be caught in moving equipment with disastrous consequences. This goes not only for escalators but elevators as well, as a child (or pet) on a leash could dart in or out of the cab as the doors close, the doors can catch the leash, and the elevator cab goes into motion … again with disastrous consequences.

The best way to protect children around moving equipment is to hold their hand and guide them safely. If using a baby cart or stroller, always use an elevator — never take them on an escalator. And always, always, always keep an eye on them. Do not let them play or linger around elevators, escalators, or even stairs.

Please help spread this important message.

Escalator & Autowalk Safety Tips

  • Instruct passengers to ride safely.
  • Hold the handrail.
  • Ride the escalator facing the appropriate direction of travel.
  • Do not lean over the handrail.
  • Keep feet away from the escalator’s sides.
  • Step over the combplates at the top and bottom of the escalator.
  • Children in strollers should never be transported on the escalator.
  • Physically challenged passengers should never use the escalator.
  • Do not transport freight on the escalator.
  • Attend and hold children’s hands when riding escalator.
  • Children should be accompanied by an adult and never left alone in the vicinity of an escalator.
  • Do not allow anyone, especially children to play on or around the escalator.
  • Do not jump on escalator.
  • Keep hands away from handrail inlets and step.

Elevator Safety Tips

  • Enter and exit the elevator promptly.
  • Watch your step when entering or exiting the elevator.
  • Children should always be accompanied by an adult when using the elevator.
  • Do not allow children to play on or around an elevator.
  • Children should be accompanied by an adult and never left alone in the vicinity of an elevator.
  • No unauthorized person should enter the elevator hoistway.
  • Elevators must not be used in the event of a fire or other emergency situations.
  • Do not transport any long objects by opening the car top emergency exit.
  • Do not jump in the car while the elevator is running.
  • Do not prevent the operation of the infrared door detection-cells with objects.
  • Never wedge an object or any part of the body in the path of a closing elevator door.
  • Comply with the stated number of persons/weight for the elevator.
  • When cleaning corridors or car interior, avoid sweeping water into the shaft.
  • Use the ‘stop’ and ‘alarm’ buttons only when required.
  • When calling the elevator, press only the button indicating the direction you wish to travel.